Close up of two buckwheat sorghum biscuits.

Buckwheat Sorghum Biscuits

Despite it’s name, buckwheat is not related to wheat and is gluten free. It is actually related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The name ‘buckwheat’ or ‘beech wheat’ comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat.

Front of package of Arrowhead Mills Organic Buckwheat Flour.

I used regular milk in these biscuits instead of buttermilk and they turned out a little bit crumbly. I think they would be much better with the buttermilk. The buckwheat flour gives these biscuits a hearty flavor and whole-grain texture. These are really good with a little gluten-free cream gravy on top!

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1/2 cup potato starch
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup butter, chilled
  • 1 cup buttermilk

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425º F. In a large mixing bowl, mix together all of the dry ingredients.

Dry ingredients mixed together in a white bowl.

Dry ingredients mixed together – buckwheat flour has a dark brown color.

Cut the butter into small pieces and use a pastry cutter to mix it into the dry ingredients.

Dry ingredients with blobs of butter mixed in.

I used a pastry cutter to blend the butter into the flour mixture.

Add the buttermilk and use a large spoon to mix well. The dough will be thick and sticky.

Buckwheat sorghum biscuit dough in a white bowl.

Add buttermilk and mix until a thick, sticky dough is formed.

For drop biscuits, use floured or moistened hands to form balls of dough and place them on a cooking sheet.

Baking sheet with 14 balls of dough ready to bake.

I moistened my hands with water to form the balls of dough. You can also use flour to coat your hands or to roll the dough out for cutting.

Buckwheat sorghum dough formed into balls on baking sheet.

Bake for 15 minutes at 425º F.
Makes about a dozen 3″ biscuits.

Baked buckwheat sorghum biscuits on baking sheet.

Baked biscuits – crispy on the outside, soft on the inside.

Two buckwheat sorghum biscuits on a small plate with a butter dish and a stick of butter in the background.

Two buckwheat sorghum biscuits cut open with butter on a small plate.

The biscuits were a tad crumbly – possibly because I used regular milk instead of buttermilk.

Recipe from Janice Mansfield

 

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Milo says….

Oh, to be at the dog park, now that June is here!

 

Assorted gluten free breads sliced on a wooden cutting board.

Gluten Free Flours

Although I’m focusing on using sorghum flour in this blog, there are other flours that are gluten-free. These are often combined to create interesting flavors and textures in gluten-free baked foods.

An assortment of gluten free flours in measuring cups.

An assortment of gluten free flours.

Here is a list of safe gluten-free flours that might be handy to have on hand:

Almond Meal Flour

Almond meal flour is made from whole almonds that have been finely ground into a powder. It is used in cookies, cakes and other desserts. Be sure to store almond meal flour in the freezer.

Amaranth

Amaranth has a very high protein and fiber content and adds a nutty flavor to gluten-free baked goods. It is most commonly used in combination with other flours to make breads, pasta, pancakes and other recipes.

Buckwheat

Although buckwheat is a grain-like ingredient, it has no relation to wheat and is, in fact, gluten-free. Buckwheat is used throughout Europe to make pancakes and serves as a fantastic alternative for gluten-free cooking, especially when used to make breakfast cereal and lower calorie gluten-free breads.

Coconut Flour

Coconut flour is a delicious and healthy alternative flour that has a high fiber content. It provides a natural sweetness and added moisture to baked goods.

Corn Flour

Compared to cornmeal, corn flour has a blander taste, as well as a lighter and finer texture when used in baked goods.

Cornstarch

Cornstarch is made by grinding up the starchy portion of a corn grain and turning it into a very fine powder. Cornstarch is typically used as a thickening agent, such as for soups, sauces and stews. It is also used in pre-made gluten-free flour blends because it creates a smoother texture.

Garbanzo Bean Flour (Chickpea Flour)

Garbanzo bean flour, aka chickpea flour, is like all bean flours in that it is high in protein and fiber content. As opposed to rice, tapioca, and potato flours, bean flours more closely mimic the texture of white flour when used in baked products.

Guar Gum

Guar gum is made from guar beans and has eight times the thickening ability of corn starch. It works well for thickening sauces and is often used to make gluten-free breads.

Potato Flour

Potato flour is made by grinding potato roots and subsequently removing the fibrous material. Potato flour is most commonly used to thicken sauces and is generally included in gluten-free flour blends because it adds moisture to baked goods.

Quinoa

Quinoa is one of the more nutritionally packed gluten-free substitutes. It is loaded with protein and a host of other vitamins and minerals. Quinoa is known for its mild nutty flavor. It can add both texture and moisture in baking.

Sorghum Flour

Sorghum flour is a millet-like grain and adds a strong flavor to gluten-free baked goods. Add in about 1/8 cup to enhance the flavors of breads, cookies and cakes. Or use it for your main flour like I do!

Tapioca Flour

Tapioca flour can add chewiness to baked goods, and is a wonderful thickening agent. Tapioca flour is known for being one of the more flavorless gluten-free flours, so it won’t affect the taste of your dish.

White Rice Flour

White rice flour is made from finely ground white rice and is most often used as a replacement for wheat flour in gluten-free breads.

Xanthan Gum

Xanthan gum is used to add volume or fluffiness to gluten-free bread and other baked goods. It is made from xanthomonas and is a natural carbohydrate.

From National Foundation for Celiac Awareness.

 

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Milo says….

I was asleep yesterday when Maizy made this post. Why has she suddenly decided to get up when it is still dark? I don’t understand humans…