Close up of two buckwheat sorghum biscuits.

Buckwheat Sorghum Biscuits

Despite it’s name, buckwheat is not related to wheat and is gluten free. It is actually related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The name ‘buckwheat’ or ‘beech wheat’ comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat.

Front of package of Arrowhead Mills Organic Buckwheat Flour.

I used regular milk in these biscuits instead of buttermilk and they turned out a little bit crumbly. I think they would be much better with the buttermilk. The buckwheat flour gives these biscuits a hearty flavor and whole-grain texture. These are really good with a little gluten-free cream gravy on top!

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1/2 cup potato starch
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup butter, chilled
  • 1 cup buttermilk

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425º F. In a large mixing bowl, mix together all of the dry ingredients.

Dry ingredients mixed together in a white bowl.

Dry ingredients mixed together – buckwheat flour has a dark brown color.

Cut the butter into small pieces and use a pastry cutter to mix it into the dry ingredients.

Dry ingredients with blobs of butter mixed in.

I used a pastry cutter to blend the butter into the flour mixture.

Add the buttermilk and use a large spoon to mix well. The dough will be thick and sticky.

Buckwheat sorghum biscuit dough in a white bowl.

Add buttermilk and mix until a thick, sticky dough is formed.

For drop biscuits, use floured or moistened hands to form balls of dough and place them on a cooking sheet.

Baking sheet with 14 balls of dough ready to bake.

I moistened my hands with water to form the balls of dough. You can also use flour to coat your hands or to roll the dough out for cutting.

Buckwheat sorghum dough formed into balls on baking sheet.

Bake for 15 minutes at 425º F.
Makes about a dozen 3″ biscuits.

Baked buckwheat sorghum biscuits on baking sheet.

Baked biscuits – crispy on the outside, soft on the inside.

Two buckwheat sorghum biscuits on a small plate with a butter dish and a stick of butter in the background.

Two buckwheat sorghum biscuits cut open with butter on a small plate.

The biscuits were a tad crumbly – possibly because I used regular milk instead of buttermilk.

Recipe from Janice Mansfield

 

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Two dinner rolls on a small plate, one is split open with butter melting on it.

Gluten-Free Yeast Dinner Rolls

Today’s recipe is from Carol Fenster’s Gluten-Free Quick & Easy cookbook. Her gluten-free yeast bread mix makes about 12 3/4 cups of flour mix, enough for four or five recipes. It can be stored in a dry, dark place for a few months in a sealed container.

These rolls were amazing – especially fresh out of the oven while still warm. I also enjoyed the leftover ones warmed up in the toaster oven. They were not gummy on inside like a lot of gluten-free breads.

The recipe calls for guar gum, in addition to xanthan gum. I didn’t have any guar gum, so I put in two extra teaspoons of xanthan gum. It called for four teaspoons of guar gum, but I was afraid four extra teaspoons of xanthan gum would make the rolls too gummy on the inside.

Carol Fenster recommends mixing the dough in a food processor. My food processor isn’t big enough to do this, so I used a large spoon to mix everything and it worked just fine.

I definitely recommend these rolls to all my friends with celiac disease. When fresh and warm they are one of the closest gluten-free options I have found to “real” bread.

Start by making a batch of Carol’s Sorghum Flour Blend:

  • 1 1/2 cups sorghum flour
  • 1 1/2 cups potato starch (not potato flour) or cornstarch
  • 1 cup tapioca flour/starch

Whisk together thoroughly and store, tightly covered, in a dark, dry, cool place.

Next, make Carol’s Yeast Bread Mix:

  • 8 cups potato starch
  • 4 cups Carol’s Sorghum Flour blend
  • 8 tablespoons cane sugar
  • 8 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 6 teaspoons table salt
  • 4 teaspoons guar gum (I substituted 2 teaspoons of xanthan gum)

Whisk or sift all ingredients together until thoroughly combined. Or you can put it in a container with a tight-fitting lid and shake it for 2 or 3 minutes until combined. Store unused mix in a dark, dry place in a covered container.

Brown mixing bowl almost full of flour mix with whisk.

Carol’s yeast bread mix makes a lot of flour mix that you can store for future use.

Dinner Rolls

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup warm (110 degree F) 1% milk (cow’s, rice, soy, potato or nut)
  • 1 envelop (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 3 large egg whites (1/2 cup), at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter or buttery spread, Earth Balance, Soy Garden, melted, or canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
  • 3 cups Carol’s Yeast Bread Mix (see recipe above)
  • Oil or butter, for brushing after baking (optional)

Instructions:

Generously grease a 7 x 11-inch nonstick (gray, not black) cake pan; set aside.

Place the warm milk in the bowl of a food processor. Add the yeast and let stand while measuring the other ingredients. (I combined them in a small mixing bowl and set aside).

Add the remaining ingredients to the food processor and process until thoroughly blended. (I mixed with a large spoon in a mixing bowl).

Gluten-free yeast bread dough in white mixing bowl with spoon stuck in it.

The dough is very sticky.

Using a 1 1/2-inch spring-action ice cream scoop, form 18 uniform-sized pieces of dough (I used a large spoon). With oiled or wet hands, shape each scoop into a smooth ball and arrange in three rows of six for a total of 18 balls. The balls will be close together. I got 14 balls, so I might have made them a tad large.

Baking tray with 14 balls of gluten-free yeast dough for rolls.

I wet my hands to smooth out each dough ball.

Cover the pan loosely with foil and let the dough rise in a warm place (75 to 80 degrees F) for 45 to 60 minutes, until level with the top of the pan.

Top of white refrigerator with foil-covered tray of dinner roll dough.

I covered the dough balls with foil and put them on top of the refrigerator to rise.

Baking tray with larger dough balls.

After sitting on the refrigerator for an hour, the dough balls had doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until the rolls are lightly browned and firm to the touch. If the rolls brown too quickly, cover loosely with foil. Remove from the pan and let cool 10 minutes on wire rack. Brush with melted butter or oil for a glossier look, if desired. Serve warm.

Baked gluten-free dinner rolls on baking tray.

The rolls were a lovely golden brown when I took them out of the oven.

Close up shot of a few of the baked rolls on the tray.

Crispy on the outside fluffy on the inside!

The dough can be refrigerated overnight after rising, if you want to make them the day before.

Baked rolls can be frozen, then reheated in the microwave on low or in a toaster oven wrapped in foil.

Two dinner rolls on a small plate, one is split open with butter melting on it.

The rolls were fluffy inside without being sticky or gummy.

 

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